Blogs

Data Center Infrastructure Management - Where's the Beef?

Vendors and pundits alike have asked the question, "what's the problem with Data Center Infrastructure Management (DCIM). Why is there no real traction in a market that should be measured in the billions?" Is the lack of traction due to poor products or are the products too pricey and complex? The answer to the adoption problems are more difficult that you might expect because it's yes and no to each of the aforementioned potential reasons and more.

Schizophrenia

My move to SDL

It’s the weekend before the holiday season and just like last year I find my self at an US airport making my way home… just in time for Christmas.

Sitting at the airport lobby, listing Christmas songs, I can’t help to reflect on the past year.

A lot has happened and things changed a lot. I have left OCOM (LeaseWeb/EvoSwitch/Dataxenter) after 2 years in September this year. Something that some of my peers in the market didn’t expect, but was long overdue. For too long I couldn’t identify myself with the way the company was run and its strategy. No good or bad here… just a big difference of opinion on vision and execution.

The last 2 months I have been able to talk to lots of different organizations in an effort to see what my next career step should be. I needed some time to recuperate from my little USA adventure with LeaseWeb & EvoSwitch. It was a great project to participate in but all the travel took a big toll on my personal life and me.

I also learned how passion for your work can be killed and what it takes to be sparked again. And how people are motivated by the Why in their jobs.

EE-IAAS – call to join IAAS energy research

The cloud market is hot. The IAAS market sees a lot of growth and new IAAS providers seem to entering the market on a daily basis. Enterprise IT shops are exploring the usage of public cloud solutions and building their own private cloud environments.

IAAS distributions like OpenStack and CloudStack seem to have thriving communities.

Organizations that are successful in deploying IAAS solutions, either for customers or internal use, see rapid growth in demand for these services.

IAAS services still need IT equipment to run on and datacenters to be housed in.  While there has been a strong focus on making the datacenter facility and IT equipment more energy efficient, not much is know about the energy efficiency of software running these IAAS services.

If the Tech Doesn’t Fit, You must Convict

The usual arguments on Twitter about new technology and solutions run the gamut from "it isn't real" to "there's only one real cloud". These "discussions" seem to go on and on and every time a new solution is introduced they are reignited.  Is all tech questionable, are all services terrific, are particular services better from specific vendors?  Most often it's more about fit in a specific organization or company, so how you position yourself is the key.

The rub

Enterprise Legacy Environment Cloud Adoption vs Netflix

Two blogs written recently one by @benkepes and the other by @jeffsussna covered the topic of cloud adoption strategies versus legacy and best case environments. In Ben's blog he talked about how Netflix is an outlier in the cloud space. That their applications and use characteristics don't match enterprise use cases and don't match the complicated verticals of infrastructure and applications in the typical enterprise data center.

Forbes Article only tells the old story of the CIO role

In a September 27th article in Forbes written by Raj Sabhlok, the President of Zoho Corp., Mr. Sabhlok discusses the disruption of the CIO role being caused by modern IT solutions (I.e., SaaS, Cloud, consumer IT etc.). The point of the article is correct: the CIO role does need to change. However, I found the changes suggested by Mr. Sabhlok to be both retro and extremely incomplete.

The argument for change in the CIO role

The need for datacenter education in emerging countries.

I recently had the privilege to travel to some of the emerging datacenter countries like Eastern Europe, Russia, Middle East, Africa and some of the Asian countries.

While I was impressed with the deployment of mobile bandwidth & devices the conversations with datacenter owners and operators scared me. With more and more people getting internet access in these countries, the need for local datacenters also rises. Taking the time to really talk and listen to the stories of some of the local datacenter owners, it reminded me of the way datacenters were build and operated 10 years ago in most western countries.

Keeping IT Relevant isn't about the Title of the CIO

Chief Information Officer, Chief Innovation Officer, Chief whatever, no chief at all, it doesn't matter. What really matters is whether the person responsible for IT can bring IT opportunity to bear on the business effectively and quickly. I know, simple concept and it's been said a thousand different times, 10 thousand different ways, but I'm going to try one more time. "The appropriate expectations from the business combined with the appropriate philosophy in the IT organization is more important that the title of the man or woman in charge."

The pain and risks of ignored IT infrastructure

Cancer, aches & pains, ticking time bombs, pick your term du jour, they all apply when IT solutions are ignored and left to grow roots. There are many reasons why IT solutions are left behind to grow roots, but in this blog I'm focusing on the process of integration after a corporate acquisition as the antagonist. 

Human behavior, resource allocation and or risk assumptions

Data Center Operators be a Twit, be Heard

As a whole we data center types don't seem to be a very talkative bunch.  I'm not sure why that is, and I can't say for sure that we're more or less talkative than many other professions. However, anecdotal evidence via the Data Center Pulse Linkedin Group and Twitter seems to supports my assertion.  We pay millions every year on conferences where we're supposed to hear from smart people and mingle (network) with other members of the Data Center community, yet as a group we do very little with social media where the effort is almost free.

Syndicate content